Select Page

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 17, which amends the state Drug and Alcohol Abuse Control Act to allow for a parent or legal guardian to provide consent over the objection of a minor when medical care or counseling is provided for substance abuse.

The bill became Act 47 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 126, which would allow a health care practitioner with prescriptive authority to prescribe epinephrine (EpiPen) auto-injections in the name of an authorized entity.

An employee or agent of the authority would complete an anaphylaxis training program as required by the Department of Health.

The bill was referred to the House Rules committee.

***

The Senate approved House Bill 153 by a vote of 42-7, which is a Joint Resolution That would amend the state Constitution to reduce the size of the House of Representatives from 203 to 151 districts.

This proposal must be approved in two consecutive sessions and by the voters via referendum before it can be enacted after the 2020 reapportionment.

The bill was referred to the House Rules committee.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 159, which clarifies that a minor’s failure to comply with a summary offense sentence constitutes a “delinquent act.” This clarification ensures that the juvenile courts retain jurisdiction over enforcement of such cases.

The legislation was prompted by a change in the court of common pleas computer system. The system, called the Common Pleas Case Management System (CPCMS), was modified approximately a year ago to include a “delinquency module,” which means that juvenile courts are now using the same system as the courts of common pleas. Under the new computer system, the failure of a juvenile to comply with a sentence arising from a summary conviction – typically, failing to pay a fine – could not be listed as a “chargeable offense.” Due to some statutory ambiguities, some judges and administrators claim they lacked the authority to simply create the necessary “chargeable offense” within the system. Specifically, it was not sufficiently clear that failure to pay the fine was a separate offense, a contempt; nor was it sufficiently clear that this contempt was within the ambit of a “delinquent act,” which triggers the jurisdiction of the juvenile court. This bill addresses the issue by clarifying both points.”

The bill became Act 49 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 594, which prohibits a prosecutor from agreeing to Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition (ARD) for defendants charged with certain sex offenses against children.
These offenses include rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse and aggravated indecent assault

The bill became Act 50 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 824 which establishes the National Guard Youth Challenge Program, a 22-week residential program for individuals aged 16-18 who have dropped out of school.
The program focuses on providing young people with life skills, employment potential, leadership development and help in obtaining their GED (General Equivalency Degree).

The bill became Act No. 51 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 863 which provides for broker price opinions (BPO) and increases the educational requirements for a sales person license.
BPOs are estimates prepared by a broker that detail the probable selling price of a parcel of real property and can be used in real estate transactions where, in the interest of time and money, a party believes it unnecessary to obtain an appraisal.

This legislation outlines the certain circumstances in which BPOs can be used.

The bill became Act No. 75 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 994 which amends the Tax Reform Code to ensure that the sale of telecommunication devices is not subject to the telecommunications companies GRT (Gross Receipts Tax).

Telephone messages transmitted within the state and in interstate commerce are subject to the state’s service provider’s GRT. The legislation excludes the sales of telephones, modems, tablets and other devices from the GRT.

The bill became Act 52 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1124, which expands the offense of neglect of a care-dependent to include endangering the welfare of a care-dependent person for whom the defendant is responsible for.

The legislation also creates the new crime of abuse of a care-dependent person. This applies to caretakers who commit physical abuse, emotional abuse and/or stalking against a care-dependent person.

The bill became Act 53 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1232, which amends the Child Protective Services Law to require K-12 schools and hospitals to publicly display a poster that contains the statewide toll- free Childline number for reporting suspected child abuse or neglect.

The legislation also extends from five to 10 years the time period for which general protective service reports must be maintained in the statewide database.

The bill also changes the status of individuals who are involved in co-op programs from “employer” to “volunteer” so they do not have to pay for a clearance to participate in volunteer services.

Health care professionals will now be required to provide notice to the state of any infant under the age of one who is afflicted by substance use or Fetal Alcohol Spectrum disorder, removing any current exemptions.

The bill became Act 54 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1419, which allows individuals who were convicted of an offense punishable by one or more years in prison and have completed all court-ordered obligations to petition the courts to restrict the dissemination of that history to limited circumstances.

The bipartisan “clean slate” measure gives low-level, non-violent offenders a way have their records sealed from public view, thus lessening barriers that can block successful re-entry into society.

This applies to records of the following offenses:
– misdemeanor of the second degree;
– misdemeanor of the third degree;
– misdemeanor offense that is punishable by imprisonment of two years or less;
– summary offenses; and
– records pertaining to charges that resulted in final disposition other than conviction.

To qualify, one must be free for 10 years from any offense punishable by imprisonment of one or more years and paid their required fines and restitution.
Court and law enforcement records concerning children shall not be disclosed unless the child was 14 years or older when adjudicated delinquent on specific serious offenses.

The bill became Act 56 of 2018.

***

The Senate approved House Bill 1448 by a vote of 44-4. The bill provides for the use of the Higher Education Comparison Tool, which is information posted online for prospective students by the Education department, PHEAA and state colleges and universities.

The legislation also includes educational provisions such as certification and testing requirements, administrative regulations, safety and security and funding allocations for the fiscal year.

The bill became Act 39 of 2018.

***

The Senate approved House Bill 1644 which establishes collaborative law participation agreements that outline the process by which affected parties resolve matters. These agreements are written and signed by all parties.

The legislation also provides for the Revised Statutory Arbitration Act, which allows for judicial relief motions that allow a court’s refusal to compel or stay arbitration based on the signed agreement.

The bill became Act 55 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1677, which provides for the Human Services Code for 2018-2019. This includes over $900 million to cover payments to the Medical Assistance Program and $8 million for Supplemental Nursing Facility Payments.

The bill also provides for the Coordinated Service Delivery Pilot program, to promote and implement innovative and research-based practices to assist in the delivery of education and human services to students and their families.

The legislation also authorizes a Medicaid outcome-based program to provide hospitals and managed care organizations with information to help reduce avoidable events and increase efficiency.

The bill became Act 40 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1738, which gives non-municipal police officers the authority of a municipal police officer while outside of their territorial boundaries under certain circumstances. This includes responding to an act that presents an immediate, clear and present danger to persons or property and to assist local, state and federal law enforcement officials.

The bill became Act 57 of 2018.

***

The Senate approved House Bill 1782 by a vote of 41-8. The bill amends the Public Utility Code to allow for alternative rate mechanisms (ARMs).

The PUC has the authority to approve, but not require specific ARMs petitioned by electric and natural gas companies such as decoupling, performance-based rates, formula rates and multiyear rates.
ARMs may include rates related to sliding scale rates and voluntary changes in rates and may also provide for the recovery of returns of capital investments. Regarding the Philadelphia Gas Works, it may also include recovery under the cash flow ratemaking method.

The bill became Act 58 of 2018.

***

The Senate voted 47-1 for House Bill 1851, which requires the state insurance department to formalize its examination process with best practices.

It requires the department to schedule a conference with the insurance company prior to examination fieldwork; codifies topics that must be discussed; and provides the company with a detailed written budget estimate for the examination.

The bill became Act 41 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1898, which amends the Board of Vehicles Act to require manufacturers to compensate new vehicle dealers for all labor and parts required by the manufacturer to perform recall repairs.

Vehicle dealers must disclose in writing any open, unremedied recalls to purchasers at the time of sale. Manufacturers cannot require new dealers to remodel facilities unless 10 years have passed since its initial construction or last major remodeling.

The bill also provides a 45-day temporary permit for new vehicle dealers. The temporary permit will be issued if a new dealer does not have the franchise approval letter, telephone business line information or certificate, lease or deed for the property when the application was submitted.

The bill allows dealers to charge fees relating to privacy and safeguarding of customer information requirements, providing financial services and preparation and retrieval of documents.

The bill became Act 59 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1918, which establishes the crime of possession and use of unlawful devices.

Any intent to defraud someone by knowingly possessing, selling or delivering a device that is designed to read and store payment card information other than for processing the information for a financial transaction is considered a violation under this legislation.

This includes devices that encode information from a payment card to a different card.

A first offense is graded as a third-degree felony. A second or subsequent offense is graded as a second-degree felony.

The bill was signed into law as Act 60 of 2018.

***

The Senate voted 44-5 in favor of House Bill 1929, the state’s 2018-19 Fiscal Code.

The fiscal code is used to implement the state’s 2018-19 budget. The measure also implements the $100 Keystone Scholars Grant Program; tightens unclaimed property notification requirements; increases the General Fund surplus transfer to the state’s “Rainy Day Fund” from 25 to 50 percent; and provides authorization for numerous grant and loan funding programs.

The measure was enacted as Act 42 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 1979 which eliminates a sunset provision on the requirement that an action upon an instrument in writing under seal must be commenced within 20 years.

This action applies to instruments under seal that expire in 2018, thus allowing them to remain under seal. This bill pertains to civil actions and is a useful tool in business and commercial financial transactions.

The bill became Act 46 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2078 which makes the following appropriations to entities within the Department of State for fiscal 2018-2019:

• $49,723,000 to the Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs
• $9,031,000 to the State Board of Medicine
• $2,422,000 to the State Board of Osteopathic Medicine
• $647,000 to the State Athletic Commission

The bill became Act 2A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2079, which provides for appropriations from the Workmen’s Compensation Administration Fund for fiscal 2018-2019.

This includes an appropriation of $71.2 million to the Department of Labor and Industry to administer the Workers’ Compensation Act and the Pennsylvania Occupational Disease Act and an appropriation of $275,000 to the Office of Small Business Advocate for its operations.

The bill became Act 3A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2080, which appropriates $1.855 million from a restricted revenue account within the General Fund to the Office of the Small Business Advocate in the Department of Community and Economic Development.

The bill became Act 4A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2081 which appropriates $5.85 million from a restricted revenue account in the General Fund to the Office of the Consumer Advocate in the Office of the Attorney General.

The bill became Act 5A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2082, which appropriates $51.637 million from the Public School Employees’ Retirement Fund to provide for the expenses of the Public School Employees’ Retirement Board.

The bill also appropriates $4.950 million from the PSERS Defined Contribution Fund for the administration of the School Employees’ Defined Contribution Plan.

The bill became Act 6A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2083, which appropriates $30.766 million from the State Employees’ Retirement Fund to provide for the expenses of the State Employees’ Retirement Board. This also provides for the payment of bills incurred and remaining unpaid at the close of the previous fiscal year.

The bill also appropriates $4.901 million from the SERS Defined Contribution Fund for the administration of the State Employees Defined Contribution Plan.

The bill became Act 7A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2084, which makes the following appropriations to the Philadelphia Parking Authority for its continued operations:

• Philadelphia Taxicab & Limousine Regulatory Fund – $2,935,000
• Philadelphia Taxicab & Medallion Fund – $200,000

The bill became Act 8A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2085, which makes an appropriation of $74.185 million from the General Fund’s restricted revenue account to the Public Utility Commission (PUC).

The bill also appropriates $6.067 million in federal funds to the PUC. This includes $3.977 million for the enforcement of the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act and $2.090 million for Motor Carrier Safety.

The bill became Act 9A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2086, which makes various appropriations for expenses relating to gaming activities, including:

• $84.875 million from the State Gaming Fund. This represents an increase of $6.823 million;
• $1.859 million from the Fantasy Contest Fund (fantasy sports); and
• $5.014 million from the Video Gaming Fund for activities relating to Video Gaming Terminals.

The bill became Act 10A of 2018.

***

The Senate voted 47-2 in favor of House Bill 2121, the state’s budget bill. The measure appropriates funds for the state, executive, legislative and judicial departments, public debt and public schools.

Democrats lauded the legislation, which makes major investments in education at every level, workforce development, health care and social justice. They called the on-time budget a “product of months of bipartisan work and compromise.”
The bill appropriates $32.092 billion in the state General Funds, $4.065 billion in state Special Funds and $27.756 billion in federal funds. Despite increases in mandated expenses – including pensions, health care and human services – the overall increase in spending is just 1.7 percent over the previous fiscal year and well below the rate of inflation.

House Bill 2121 increases funding for basic education by $100 million to a total of more than $6 billion. It also increases the state investment in early childhood education by $25 million and special education by $15 million. Educational Improvement Tax Credits – which help students trapped in failing schools – will also see a $25 million increase. State System of Higher Education funding will increase of 3.3 percent, and funding for state-related universities will increase by 3 percent. The funding is expected to prevent tuition costs from rising faster than the inflation rate.

The budget makes a historic investment in school safety with $70 million in funding – including $60 million in new money — for school resource officers, security equipment and other proven methods of preventing school violence.

The measure also increases funding for job creation and community improvement programs by more than $11 million over the previous fiscal year.

The bill became Act 1A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2242 which provides for the state’s appropriation to Penn State University. This includes $237 million for General Support and $22.736 million for the Penn College of Technology. These appropriations represent a 3 percent increase over the previous year.

The bill also authorizes the appropriation of monies contained within the Agricultural College Land Script Fund account for Agricultural Research and Extension Services.

The bill became Act 11A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2243 which provides for the state’s appropriation to the University of Pittsburgh. This includes $148.536 million for General Support and $2.846 million for Rural Education Outreach. This represents a 3 percent increase over the previous year.

The bill became Act 12A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2244, which provides for the state’s appropriation to Temple University. This includes $155.104 million for General Support. This represents a 3 percent increase over the previous year.

The bill became Act 13A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2245, which provides for the state’s appropriation to Lincoln University. This includes $14.869 million for General Support. This represents a 3 percent increase over the previous year.

The bill became Act 14A of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved House Bill 2246, which provides for the state appropriation to the University of Pennsylvania. This includes $13.039 million for Veterinary Activities and $289,000 for the Center for Infectious Diseases. This represents a 3 percent increase over the previous year.

The bill became Act 15A of 2018.

***

The Senate approved House Bill 2468 by a vote of 37-12. The bill prevents any government entity with the power to exercise eminent domain from condemning land subject to a conservation easement, unless receiving approval from the county’s Orphans’ Court.

The request may only be approved if the court determines there is no reasonable alternative.

The condemnation approval is not required for any public utility facility or project subject to approval by a federal agency; and the bill provides for an exception for underground public utility facilities that will not permanently impact the open space benefits protected by the easement.

The bill does not apply to any emergency project that is immediately necessary to protect life or property.

The bill became Act 45 of 2018.

***

The Senate voted 32-17 for House Bill 2477, which amends the Medical Marijuana Act to clarify legislative intent concerning academic clinical research of medical cannabis.

The bill gives medical schools the freedom to select partners in medical cannabis research programs, providing those partners meet grower/processor and dispensary licensing requirements. Medical schools must also be approved and certified by the Department of Health.

The Department may register up to eight clinical registrants for the purposes of medical cannabis research.

The bill became Act 43 of 2018.

***

The Senate voted 47-1 in favor of Senate Bill 172, which establishes Automated Speed Enforcement in Work Zones throughout Pennsylvania. The measure aims to deter speeding in work zones and ultimately improve motorist and roadway worker safety.

The bill has three key provisions.

PennDOT and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission will conduct a five-year pilot program by placing cameras equipped with LIDAR/radar in active work zones to take photos of license plates of vehicles that exceed work zone speed limits by at least 11 miles-per-hour. Violation notices will be mailed to the vehicle owner. There will be a warning for the first violation, a $75 fine for the second violation and $150 fine for subsequent violations.

Penalties will not be deemed criminal convictions and will not be made part of one’s operating record, nor may the imposition of the penalty be subject to merit rating for insurance purposes.

The legislation also establishes a five-year pilot camera enforcement program in Philadelphia along the entire length of U.S. 1 (Roosevelt Boulevard) between Ninth Street and the Bucks County line. City Council must adopt an ordinance to begin the enforcement program.

The third provision in the law allows the use of LIDAR speed-measuring devices for the automated speed enforcement programs and the state police.

The bill was signed into law as Act 86 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 431 which increases fines for littering; doubles fines for littering on highway enforcement corridors and triples fines when the litter originates from a commercial business.

Official traffic control devices will be placed to warn motorists of the increased penalties for violations along litter enforcement corridors.

The bill became Act 62 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 530, which amends the Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors Act by updating license requirements and clarifying the role for the independent practices of clinical social work, marriage and family therapy and professional counseling.

It adds to the definitions of each of these practitioners that the individual engaging in the work styles themselves as a practitioner.

The bill outlines licensing requirements for each of these fields and outlines penalties of up to $10,000 for people who illegally engage in this work.

The bill became Act No. 76 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 564, which urges PennDOT to consider the use of protective fencing around bridges that have had instances of suicide or attempted suicide on them.

Under the bill, PennDOT will consider installing such fencing as part of its preliminary design work in building a bridge.

The bill became Act 65 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 595 which provides for the electronic notarization of documents.

The legislation outlines the regulations under which this practice is permitted. The notary public needs to have personal knowledge of the identity of the individual or be able reasonably identify the individual through at least two types of proofing processes or services and be able to identify the record as being the same as the one signed by the individual.

The bill also lays out the process for notarizing documents electronically for an individual located outside of the country.

The bill was referred to the House State Government committee.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 735, which would have amended the Real Estate Tax Sale Law by establishing an optional “County Demolition and Rehabilitation Fund” in certain counties where a fee assessed for each property sold for delinquent taxes could be used towards the demolition/rehabilitation of dilapidated buildings.

The bill died in the House.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 817, which extends the lease for a portion of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Veterans’ Center in Chester County.

The measure also authorizes other various land conveyances and leases.

The bill was enacted as Act 66 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 819, which would have allowed “agritourism” activity on land subject to a conservation easement.

Agritourism activities provide education and entertainment to the public to help promote agriculture while providing an additional revenue stream for farmers.

Activities in the bill would have included: public interaction with rural animals; farming/harvesting activities; tours, exhibitions and taste tests that promote farm products; bed and breakfast operations that encourage engagement with farming; equine training and recreational riding; games, rides and other entertainment activities; and events held in conjunction with seasonal festivals to promote local agricultural products.

The bill died in the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee.

***

The Senate approved Senate Bill 892, which allows students enrolled in chiropractic school to perform chiropractic activities that are part of the school’s curriculum without obtaining a license to practice.

A student must be under the direct supervision of a board-licensed chiropractor when performing chiropractic activities as part of their educational curriculum.

The bill was presented to the governor.

***

The Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 945, which amends the vehicle code to allow applicants to make a $6 contribution to the Veterans’ Trust Fund when applying for a two-year vehicle registration through PennDOT’s website.

The legislation was referred to the House Transportation Committee.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 978, which allows a home health or hospice agency to safely dispose of unused prescription medications following the death or discharge of a patient.

Before disposing of the drugs, the agency personnel need the permission of the patient, patient’s family member, caregiver, or health care representative. Items must be safely disposed of in accordance with guidelines set by the federal FDA (Food and Drug Administration).

The bill was presented to the governor.

***

The Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 1001, which would give the Department of Health authority to declare public health emergencies for 90 days.

Such declarations can only be extended by the Secretary of the Department of Health. The bill would also provide the definition and criteria for what constitutes a public health emergency. Trained, licensed, or certified public health workers would be authorized to administer treatment during a public health emergency as a necessary means to prevent and control the spread of a disease.

The bill was referred to the House Health Committee.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 1011, which is a joint resolution that would amend the state constitution to formally establish rights for crime victims.

The bill was amended to clarify the rights of victims and give juvenile court judges discretion when handling restitution issues.

The joint resolution was filed in the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth as Pamphlet Laws Resolution No. 1.

***

The Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 1047, which would remove Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority oversight in Pittsburgh.

Under the bill, the Secretary of Community and Economic Development could immediately certify that the assistance of the Intergovernmental Authority is no longer needed once Pittsburgh has annual operating budgets and approved five-year financial plans once the authority’s minimum seven-year term is completed.

The authority voted 3-1 in January of 2018 to shut down its oversight as Pittsburgh was positioned to exit Act 47. The move requires legislative approval. The authority has overseen Pittsburgh’s spending and debt obligations since 2004, when Pittsburgh’s debt burden amounted to more than one-fifth of its operating budget. Since then, the city has cut its workforce by 26 percent, restructured employee benefits and enacted fiscal reforms.

The bill was referred to the House Urban Affairs Committee.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 1095, which delays the use of the Keystone Exams as a graduation requirement or benchmark for the need to participate in a project-based assessment until the 2021-2022 school year.

In a school year where demonstrated proficiency on a Keystone exam is required, a student will be deemed proficient if they successfully complete all locally-established grade-based course work or receive a passing grade in an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate level class in the areas covered by the Keystone Exams.

Other ways for students to demonstrate that they are proficient and ready for graduation are to show that they have been accepted to an accredited college, have successfully completed Career Technical Education coursework or pre-apprenticeship program, or prove that they will be employed full-time upon graduation.

The bill became Act 158 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 1101, which will reduce barriers for those who want to obtain a title for a recovered stolen vehicle.

Under the bill, if the cost of repairs to the recovered vehicle is more than 50 percent of the vehicle’s replacement value, and the owner elects to retain a title to the vehicle, the owner may apply for a certificate of title branded “recovered-theft vehicle.” If the insurer is a self-insurer, the assessment of damage is to be completed by a licensed physical damage appraiser who is not affiliated with or employed by the self-insurer.

The measure was enacted as Act 74 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously passed Senate Bill 1126, which requires that every magisterial judge in the state is trained to determine if defendants before them are unable to pay their accrued court fines and fees.

This legislation is aimed at preventing people with no way to pay for their court fees from sitting in jail indefinitely. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that it is unconstitutional to jail defendants who are too poor to pay their court fees. The training will enable district justices to more easily differentiate between those who are unwilling, and those who are unable, to pay their court costs.

The bill was referred to the House Judiciary Committee on June 25.

***

The Senate voted 43-3 in favor of Senate Bill 1132. The bill will establish a statewide Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Commission.

This legislation is in response to the findings of the bipartisan Joint State Government Commission and its review of best practices of alternative dispute resolution services. The committee found that ADR was a cost-effective alternative to litigation in a variety of disputes. The commission will work to continue alternative dispute resolution initiatives throughout the state.

The bill was referred to the House Judiciary Committee on June 21.

***

The Senate voted 47-1 for Senate Bill 1142, which establishes the “Safe2Say Program” for anonymous reporting of potential school threats.

The measure provides a system for people to anonymously report potential threats to schools or students. The information reported will be quickly relayed to relevant law enforcement and school administration officials. The bill also mandates training for those who take the anonymous reports, as well as the law enforcement and school officials who respond to the reports.

The bill was signed into law as Act 44 of 2018.

***

The Senate unanimously approved Senate Bill 1171, which replaces the Nutrient Management Advisory Board with a newly created Farm Animal Advisory Board.

The creation of the Farm Animal Advisory Board gives Pennsylvania farmers a greater ability to collaborate and consult with state agencies when it comes to proposed environmental regulations, interpretations, and enforcement changes impacting animal operations.

The bill became Act 162 of 2018.

***

The Senate voted 42-7 for Senate Bill 1172, which would have prohibited “price gauging” during declared statewide emergencies.

The bill would have prohibited price increases of more than 20 percent (compared to the price of those goods seven days prior) on consumer goods during a declared state of emergency.

Senate Bill 1172 was Vetoed by the governor (veto #5 of 2018). He vetoed the bill because it alters existing standards of what price gauging is, permits pre-established increased costs during emergencies, and encourages price increases prior to a declaration of a state of emergency.

###