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Recovery Month

Recovery is for Everyone:

Every Person.

Every Family.

Every Community.

What is Recovery Month?

September is Recovery Month, a celebration of the power and hope of recovery. Millions of Americans battle addiction each year. Yet many don’t realize, addiction is a family disease. It affects everyone close to it, not just the individual with the substance use disorder. Sustained recovery from a substance use disorder requires everyone who has been impacted- family, friends, loved ones- to be part of the healing process and ongoing management of recovery.

Addiction is also a disease that thrives in isolation. When families and communities can come together to support access to quality treatment, celebrate the hope of recovery and dispel stigma and shame often associated with addiction, we change the conversation and make it easier for individuals and families to embrace recovery.

Join us in celebrating the transformative possibilities that can be achieved with treatment and recovery. Attend a local event, educate yourself about the disease of addiction, learn about individuals who are living in recovery, or share resources with someone who may need help or support. There’s many ways to participate!

Prevention works. Treatment is effective. There is hope in recovery, for everyone.

National Recovery Month Rally

September 21, 2021


SAMHSA National Helpline
1-800-662-HELP (4357)

Resources

Online Resources

 “Get Help Now” through the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs is a helpful online tool to assist with addiction treatment options.

Our Priorities, Our Work

Combating opioid abuse and addiction must continue to be a priority at the national, state, and local levels.

The PA Senate Democrats continue to fight to:

Establish more entry points and beds for treatment

Strengthen prescription writing guidelines

Make naloxone more readily available to treat overdoses

Allow families to petition for mandatory treatment of their loved ones

Work with pharmaceutical companies to identify solution and prevention methods for addiction

Impose an assessment on the wholesale imports of opioids into Pennsylvania

Increase educational addition programs in schools

Overdose Awareness Day

August 31, 2021


PA marked International Overdose Awareness Day on the steps of the state Capitol on August 31, 2021. Sen. John Kane addressed parents, individuals in recovery, state lawmakers, and those with the Pennsylvania Chapter of Team Sharing in remembering those who have died, and acknowledging the grief of family and friends left behind.

Later in the evening, Senators John Kane and Tim Kearney hosted an Overdose Awareness Day Vigil with Delaware County Council, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Stollsteimer, and Congresswoman Mary Gay Scanlon. The vigil honored lives lost to overdoses.

Senator Kane and Senator Kearney have introduced a Senate Resolution designating August 31 as Overdose Awareness Day in Pennsylvania.

Overdose Awareness Day at the Pennsylvania Capitol


Overdose Candlelight Vigil


Opioid Epidemic Hearing Series

State Senate Committee Holds Philadelphia Hearing on Opioid Epidemic


Philadelphia – February 21, 2020 – At the request of state Senators Anthony H. Williams (D- Delaware/Philadelphia) and Tim Kearney (D- Chester/Delaware), the Senate Democratic Policy Committee held a public hearing today in Philadelphia on ways to combat the opioid epidemic and strengthen addiction treatment.

“The opioid epidemic has hit Philadelphia particularly hard,” Williams said. “We need to find a workable and compassionate strategy for getting these drugs out of our neighborhoods and helping people and their families who are struggling with opioid addiction.”

State Senate Committee Holds Delaware County Hearing on State’s Opioid Epidemic


Media – February 12, 2020 – At the request of state Senators Tim Kearney (D- Chester/Delaware) and Anthony H. Williams (D – Delaware/Philadelphia), the Senate Democratic Policy Committee today held a hearing on combating the opioid addiction epidemic in Pennsylvania.

“The opioid epidemic has hit our communities hard, and it’s going to take an all-hands-on-deck approach to prevent addiction, get people into treatment and save lives,” Kearney said. “This hearing will be critical to developing the bold plans we need to tackle this crisis head on and provide communities with the resources they need.”