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HB 1508, PN 1603 (Saylor) – House Bill 1508, Printer’s Number 1603 makes annual appropriations for fiscal year 2021-22 to the Department of State for use by the Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs in support of the professional licensure boards.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of a majority of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

The appropriations noted in this bill reflect amounts identical to those recommended in the Governor’s 2021-22 Executive Budget. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1509, PN 1604 (Saylor) – House Bill 1509, Printer’s Number 1604, provides for appropriations for fiscal year (FY) 2021-22 from the Workmen’s Compensation Administration Fund to the Department of Labor and Industry (L&I) and to the Office of Small Business Advocate in the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED).

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of a majority of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

The appropriations noted in the bill reflect amounts as recommended by the Governor’s Executive Budget for FY 2021-22. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1510, PN 1605 (Saylor) – House Bill 1510, Printer’s Number 1605, makes an annual appropriation from a restricted revenue account within the General Fund for the Office of Small Business Advocate (OSBA) in the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) for fiscal year 2021-22.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of a majority of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

The appropriation provided in House Bill 1510 reflects an amount identical to that appropriated in the current 2020-21 fiscal year. The Governor’s 2021-22 Executive Budget also recommends $1.896 million for the Office of Small Business Advocate. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1511, PN 1606 (Saylor) – House Bill 1511, Printer’s Number 1606, makes an annual appropriation from a restricted revenue account within the General fund for the operation of the Office of Consumer Advocate (OCA) in fiscal year 2021-2022.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of a majority of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

The appropriation noted above reflects the amount identical to that appropriated in the current 2020-2021 fiscal year. The Governor’s 2021-2022 Executive Budget recommends the same appropriation in the upcoming budget year. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1512, PN 1607 (Saylor) – House Bill 1512, Printer’s Number 1607 makes annual appropriations to provide for expenses of the Public School Employees’ Retirement Board for fiscal year 2021-22.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of most of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

House Bill 1512 appropriates $52.294 million and $0.955 million from the Public School Employees’ Retirement Fund and PSERS Defined Contribution Fund to the Public School Employees’ Retirement Board, respectively. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1513, PN 1845 (Saylor) – House Bill 1513, Printer’s Number 1845 makes annual appropriations to provide for expenses of the State Employees’ Retirement Board for fiscal year 2021-22.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of most of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

House Bill 1513 appropriates $33.069 million and $4.398 million from the State Employees’ Retirement Fund and SERS Defined Contribution Fund to the State Employees’ Retirement Board, respectively. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1514, PN 1609 (Saylor) – House Bill 1514, Printer’s Number 1609, makes annual appropriations to the Philadelphia Parking Authority for fiscal year 2020-21.

House Bill 1514 appropriates $2.749 million from the Philadelphia Taxicab and Limousine Regulatory Fund and $100,000 from the Philadelphia Taxicab Medallion Fund to the Philadelphia Parking Authority for the 2021-22 fiscal year. These amounts are the same as the Governor’s 2021-22 Executive Budget request.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of a majority of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1515, PN 1610 (Saylor) – House Bill 1515, Printer’s Number 1610 makes annual appropriations to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) for fiscal year 2021-22.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of statutorily created boards or commissions, and only requires the approval of most of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

House Bill 1515 appropriates $78.477 million from a restricted revenue account within the General Fund and $5.128 million from federal funds to the PUC. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1516, PN 1611 (Saylor) – House Bill 1516, Printer’s Number 1611 makes the annual appropriations for the regulation and enforcement relating to gaming for fiscal year 2021-22.

These appropriations are considered “preferred appropriations” and are passed annually as part of the Commonwealth’s budget process. A preferred appropriation provides funding for the ordinary expenses of state government, such as operations of a statutorily created boards or commission, and only requires the approval of a majority of the members in each chamber of the General Assembly.

House Bill 1516 appropriates $86.494 million from the State Gaming Fund, $518,000 from the Fantasy Contest Fund and $1.158 million from the Video Gaming Fund. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 125, PN 92 (Mizgorski) – An Act designating a bridge, identified as Bridge Key 1951, carrying State Route 4017 on Wetzel Road, Shaler Township, Allegheny County, as the Commander William J. Schofield, III, Memorial Bridge. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 184, PN 1884 (Keefer) – Amends Title 18 Pa.C.S. §2505 (Causing or Aiding Suicide) by adding a new subsection (c)  that directs the Pennsylvania Commission on Sentencing to provide for sentencing enhancements if the victim is under the age of 18 or has an intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder. The bill also amends Title 42 further providing for definitions. A vote of 34-16 was recorded.

HB 246, PN 214 (Mihalek) – Amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) to extend Pennsylvania’s Rape Shield Law to protect victims of human trafficking. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 264, PN 1003 (Heffley) – This bill amends the Real Estate Tax Sale Law to include additional registration and reporting requirements to ensure bidders are eligible to purchase property at a tax sale. A vote of 49-1 recorded.

SB 708, PN 900 (Bartolotta) – Amends the Act of November 24, 1998 (P.L. 882, No. 111), known as the Crime Victims Act, by making numerous changes to the crime victims’ rights and compensation framework. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

SB 772, PN 912 (DiSanto) – Amends the Insurance Company Law of 1921 to adopt a consumer best interest standard for annuity recommendations. The bill also reduces the minimum nonforfeiture rate for individual deferred annuities. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 843, PN 827 (Rowe) – Amends Title 23 Pa.C.S. (Domestic Relations) to add human trafficking to the list of criminal offenses that the Court must consider when making a custody determination. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 925, PN 920 (Borowicz) – An Act designating a bridge, identified as Bridge Key 12275, carrying State Route 1002 over the West Branch of the Susquehanna River, Castanea Township, Clinton County, as the Petty Officer Stephen “Turbo” Toboz, Jr, Bridge. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 944, PN 1865 (E. Nelson) – Amends the Administrative Code of 1929 to provide duties to the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs (DDAP) to require inpatient treatment facilities to provide notification to an emergency contact when a patient leaves a treatment facility against medical advice. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 954, PN 1323 (Stephens) – Amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) and Title 23 (Domestic Relations) to permit law enforcement agencies to share child abuse investigation information with county children and youth services agencies, the Department of Human Services and children’s advocacy centers. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1024, PN 1823 (Schemel) – The bill amends the Medical Marijuana Act (P.L. 84, No. 16 of 2016) to make changes to the Act related to caregivers, grower/processors production of medical marijuana, patient access to medical marijuana, and laboratory testing.

Amendment A02029 (Street) – Allows a medical marijuana patient 21 years or older who has been a PA resident for at least 30 days to grow cannabis for personal use with certain limitations:

  • Up to 5 plants per patient not more than 5 inches tall
  • Grown in an enclosed and locked space, only on residential property (but an owner can prohibit cultivation by lessee)
  • Seeds purchased from dispensary
  • Plants cannot be stored in location where subject to ordinary public view, and secure them from unauthorized access including from someone under 21 years old
  • Only patients residing at residence or their authorized agent, can tend to cannabis
  • Patients growing more than permitted or selling/giving away plants, cannabis or infused products are liable to penalties provided by law as well as loss of cultivation privileges

Senator K. Ward motioned to table the amendment. The motion was approved by a vote of 29-21.

Amendment A02152 (Regan)

  1. Allows patients to authorize hospice and home care organizations and residential facilities to designate individuals to act as caregivers (i.e., to pick up product at the for them).
  2. Removes the limitation that an individual cannot act as a caregiver for more than 5 patients.
  3. Increases the supply of medical marijuana that can be dispensed from a 30-day to 90-day supply.
  4. Allow the Department of Health (DOH) to receive criminal background checks electronically, and allow the employee to work at the medical marijuana organization until DOH approves/disapproves.
  5. Allow dispensaries to switch the designations of their dispensaries as primary, secondary or tertiary. 6. Narrows the prohibition on employees at facilities who have certain drug-related convictions to only felony convictions, and provides an exception for individuals for whom it has been 10 years since the entry of a final disposition of drug-related felony convictions or one year since release from imprisonment, whichever is later.
  6. Requires DOH to allow facilities to have two-way communication with DOH’s seed-to-sale system.
  7. Exempt DOH employees and contractors requesting or obtaining information under the act from criminal liability for disclosure of such information unless they willfully and knowingly disclose prohibited information under the act.
  8. Allow grower/processors (G/Ps) to obtain and transport seed and immature plan material from outside PA for at least one 30-day period per year
  9. Obtain and harvest bulk postharvest medical marijuana plant material.
  10. Remediate (by solvent-based extraction methods only) yeast- or mold- contaminated plants that failed a lab test. They can only be remediated and processed into topical form, must pass a second final processed test and be labeled as remediated. This provision is subject to: a. An academic clinical research center (ACRC) must conduct a 6 months study on remediation with its CR, the findings of which must be presented to the Advisory Board for a recommendation and approval by the Secretary of Health. b. CRs and G/Ps must seek approval from DOH to implement a Secretary-approved method in its extraction/remediation process.
  11. Allow G/Ps to obtain harvested hemp from those holding permits from the Department of Agriculture if the hemp is subject to the same medical marijuana lab testing. Also, allows G/Ps to add the hemp or hemp-derived additives or pharmaceutical, DOH-approved substances (for use in processing). In approving added substances, DOH must consider whether the substance is permitted for use in food by the FDA or Generally Recognized As Safe or if it constitutes a known hazard.
  12. Require G/Ps and dispensaries to maintain continuous video surveillance and retain for 180 days.
  13. Allows G/Ps to use pesticides that are registered with the Dept of Ag and designated for use by the Secretary of Ag in consultation with the Secretary of Health. The list must be published in the Pa. Bulletin 30 days after this bill is enacted, updated annually and posted to DOH’s website.
  14. Allows G/Ps to contract with more than one lab.
  15. Provides for “stability testing” at 6-month intervals until 6 months past the expiration date.
  16. Allow dispensaries to provide remote pharmacist or physician consultations and curbside delivery.
  17. Release funds in the Medical Marijuana Program Fund.
  18. Extend the expiration of temporary regulations until May 31, 2022.
  19. Allow the Advisory Board to provide written reports and recommendations to the Governor and General Assembly. Also, it allows the Secretary to effectuate these recommendations, but requires statutory change for any increase in the number of permits.

The amendment was approved by a vote of 47-3. The bill was approved by a vote of 47-3.

HB 1147, PN 1202 (Gaydos) – Amends Title 42 (Judiciary and Judicial Procedure) to require individuals convicted of human trafficking offenses, involving victims who are minors, to attend and participate in sex offender counseling and therapy programs conducted by the Department of Corrections. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1300, PN 1869 (Grove) – This legislation amends Act No. 320 of 1937, known as the Pennsylvania Election Code, to make many changes including shortening the time to apply for voter registration; shortening the time to apply for a mail-in or absentee ballot; shortening the time to vote a mail-in or absentee ballot; imposing additional duties on the Secretary of the Commonwealth and county boards of elections; giving the General Assembly special standing in challenges to the Election Code; establishing the Bureau of Election Audits in the Department of the Auditor General; enhancing the authority of the Pennsylvania Election Law Advisory Board from an advisory board to a rulemaking board; providing additional voting access for seniors and people with disabilities; adding requirements for examination and approval of voting machines; doubling penalties for violations of the Election Code; promising early voting in the distant future; and providing for free voter ID cards.

Amendment A02042 (Costa) – The amendment incudes the language of SB 11 of 2019-20 relating to Campaign Finance Reform and also does the following:

  • Provides caps on individual and aggregate campaign contributions for individuals, political committees, PACS and other donors. Current PA has not cap on contributions.
  • Regulates out-of-state contributions for instate candidates. (They must pledge to follow PA law).
  • Requires a publication of individuals and business entities with contracts with the General Assembly.
  • Permits Local Campaign Finance Laws that are more stringent than state law.
  • Regulates Independent Expenditures—Requires disclosure of amounts and donors.
  • Regulates political spending by corporations and other business entities and associations by requiring shareholder approval and disclosure

Senator Argall motioned to table the amendment. The motion passed by a vote of 29-21.

The bill was approved by a vote of 29-21.

HB 1349, PN 1443 (Pickett) – Amends the Insurance Department Act of 1921 to enable the Pennsylvania Insurance Department to electronically process criminal history records for insurance producer applicants. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1390, PN 1506 (Saylor) – An Act designating a bridge, identified as Bridge Key 37590, carrying Pennsylvania Route 425 over Fishing Creek, Chanceford Township, York County, as the PFC James Joseph Criswell Memorial Bridge. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 1429, PN 1902 (Schlegel Culver) – Amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) by establishing a new criminal offense relating to the financial exploitation of older adults and care-dependent persons. A vote of 49-1 was recorded.

HB 1431, PN 1547 (Klunk) – Amends Title 18 (Crimes and Offenses) to expand the definition of “abuse of a care dependent person.”  A vote of 48-2 was recorded.

HB 1621, PN 1797 (Marshall) – Creates a free-standing act known as the Small Wireless Facilities Deployment Act to deploy 5G technology to Pennsylvania communities. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

SR 146, PN 956 (Aument) – A resolution directing the Legislative Budget and Finance Committee to conduct a study on the statutory caps on recovery in sovereign immunity cases. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

SB 255, PN 230 (Browne) – This bill is the General Appropriations Act for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2021 and ending June 30, 2022. Senate concurred in House amendments. A vote of 43-7 was recorded.

SB 381, PN 367 (Martin) – This bill amends the act of March 10, 1949 (P.L. 30, No. 14), known as the Public School Code of 1949, by repealing the sunset clause in section 1201.1 (relating to substitute teaching permit for prospective teachers). Senate concurred in House amendments. A vote of 40-10 was recorded.

HB 336, PN 311 (R. MacKenzie) – This legislation will update the Administrative Code to reflect the Department’s name and structure due to Act 86 of 2012. 

Amendment A02153 (Muth) – This amendment removes the language requiring DEP permitting for the transfer, storage or processing of oil and gas liquid waste. Senator K. Ward motioned to table the amendment. The motion was approved by a vote of 29-21.

Amendment A02155 (Muth) – This amendment removes the language abrogating the Labor and Industry overtime regulations defining employment in executive, administrative and professional capacities. The amendment failed by a vote of 21-29.

The bill was approved by a vote of 28-22.

SB 574, PN 621 (Brewster) – This bill would amend the Real Estate Tax Sale Law to allow counties to levy fees upon the purchase of tax delinquent or real estate owned properties and dedicate said fees into a fund used to support the demolition or rehabilitation of blighted properties. A vote of 48-2 was recorded.

HB 952, PN 1310 (Oberlander) – This legislation would replace the sales and use tax refund program for data center equipment purchases with a tax exemption program. A vote of 46-4 was recorded.

HB 1348, PN 1442 (Saylor) – This bill amends the Fiscal Code to provide for the transfer of federal funds within the Department of Human Services (DHS). A vote of 42-8 was recorded.

SB 674, PN 745 (Kearney) – Makes four specific changes to the Borough Code in a manner consistent with recent revisions to the First Class Township Code as comprehensively updated by Act 96 of 2020. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

SB 397, PN 870 (Pittman) – Amends the Osteopathic Medical Practice Act to provide for physician assistants (PA-Cs), including practices, representation on the osteopathic board and physician oversight. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

SB 398, PN 871 (Pittman) – Amends the Medical Practice Act to provide for physician assistants (PA-Cs), including practices, representation on the state medical board and physician oversight. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 957, PN 1852 (Moul) – Amends the Municipality Authorities Act to enable the owner of a property with multiple units, which is served by a single water meter, to periodically request the authority to adjust the amount billed if it is determined the amount billed exceeds actual usage by 30% or more. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

HB 952, PN 1934 (Oberlander) – This legislation would replace the sales and use tax refund program for data center equipment purchases with a tax exemption program. A vote of 46-4 was recorded.

SB 411, PN 967 (Browne) – The bill statutorily merges the Department of Corrections (DOC) and the Board of Probation and Parole (BPP). Senate concurred in House amendments. A vote of 47-3 was recorded.

SB 532, PN 968 (Stefano) – The bill names various bridges and roads throughout the Commonwealth. Senate concurred in House amendments. A vote of 50-0 was recorded.

The Senate confirmed the following executive nominations by a vote of 47-2:

James R. Biery, Banking and Securities Commission (new appointment)

Mary E. Zenner, Banking and Securities Commission (new appointment)

Jennifer C. Faustman, State Charter School Appeal Board (new appointment)

Tom H. Killion, State Charter School Appeal Board (new appointment)

Stacey L. Marten, State Charter School Appeal Board (new appointment)

Jodi R. Schwartz, State Charter School Appeal Board (new appointment)

Robert N. Barley, Milk Marketing Board (reappointment)

Randy L. Waggoner, State Board of Certified Real Estate Appraisers (new appointment)

Gary S. Baker, State Tax Equalization Board (new appointment)

Brittany J. Mercadante, State Tax Equalization Board (new appointment)

The Senate confirmed the following executive nominations by a vote of 47-3:

Marcus L. Brown, Pennsylvania Parole Board (new appointment)